Robin Chase on Marketplace

Veniam CEO Robin Chase (LF ’95) participated in a recent NPR Marketplace conversation about education and technology in “Conversations about mobility, live from Aspen.”

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Matthew Kiefer on the Right Questions about the Olympics

Matthew Kiefer (LF ’96 and UPD visiting lecturer on land use planning) and his co-author Samuel Tyler, president of the Boston Municipal Research Bureau, point out that contrary to what we’ve been reading in the media, the questions about financing for the 2024 Olympics are more complex than public versus private funding. read more

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Cynthia Davidson to Curate the US Exhibition at Venice Biennale

Cynthia Davidson (LF ’89) and Monica Ponce de Leon, dean of Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning at the University of Michigan, have been selected by the State Department as curators of the United States Pavilion exhibition in the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennale. read more

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Landscape vs. Monument? Charles Birnbaum Weighs In

Charles Birnbaum (LF '98) has been reading between the lines of the competition guidelines for a World War I Memorial proposed for Pershing Park in Washington, DC. read more

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Testing the Boundaries of Art

The June 22 issue of the New Yorker profiled Mark Bradford, whose success as a contemporary artist exists side by side with his work with foster children in South Los Angeles through his foundation Art and Practice. He’s walking in the footsteps of Theaster Gates (LF ’11) and Rick Lowe (LF ’02), who sits on his board. Read “What Else Can Art Do?”

Photo: Art and Practice Foundation website

 

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Call for South Asia Emerging Artists

The Harvard University South Asia Institute’s Arts Initiative welcomes applications from emerging artists from South Asia to participate in 4 days of discourse, exhibits and events with students and faculty at Harvard University. Two artists, whose work draws attention to economic, policy and social issues, will be selected for the 2016-2017 academic year, one for the fall semester and one for spring. The deadline for fall 2015 is August 15; deadline for  spring 2016 is December 15.

Learn more and apply.

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Growing Greenway Links: Sarah Bolivar’s Doebele Summer

Loeblogger Sarah Bolivar, with the support of a Doebele Fellowship, pursues her vision of contributing to “a more egalitarian design culture” in her work this summer with Greenway Links. It’s a project co-founded by Matthew Kiefer (LF '96 and visiting lecturer on land use development) in collaboration with LivableStreets. Sarah is keeping in touch to share what she’s learning about growing public backing and use of a network that serves nature lovers, recreation-seekers and commuters. read more

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Saving Russell Page

Was it Charles Birnbaum’s (LF ’98) critique in the Huffington Post that made the Frick Collection pause before taking the irrevocable step of destroying its Russell Page garden to make way for expansion? His opposition, the first voiced, surely made a contribution. Read Birnbaum’s comments about the happy resolution.

Photo courtesy of Michael Dunn, Cultural Landscape Foundation

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Loeb Lab: Right-Size Housing

In “From SROs to Micro-Units,” Barbara Knecht (LF ‘93) looked at the past and future of micro housing in urban centers. In the following commentary, Eli Spevak (LF ’14) turns his attention to suburbs and smaller-scale cities. He argues it’s time to address the mismatch between the types of homes encouraged by codes put in place one or two generations ago and the needs of real people and households who live in the US today. read more

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Surface Tensions: Scott Campbell’s Lincoln Loeb Lecture

2015 Loeb Scott Campbell, a joint fellow at the Lincoln Institute and the Loeb Fellowship, explores innovations in the management of water resources in the context of land trusts in Surface Tensions: Large Landscape Conservation and the Future of America’s Rivers. Read an account of his remarks at Lincoln House in May, or view the lecture in its entirety.

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